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420015, . , . , . 72/2
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420015, . , . , . 72/2.: (843) 221-64-42, 221-63-98, 221-64-63 (.)vs.tat@sudrf.ru




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16.12.2010
  

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( -),    Montana Law.
 
 
 
 
 

A group of five judges from Tatarstan, in southwestern Russia, are in Great Falls this week to explore the differences and similarities between the Russian and American justice systems.

Three Russian supreme-court justices and two district-court judges, all from the same region, have been in Montana since Friday, meeting with a number of judges and sitting in on court proceedings. The visitors kept an eye specifically on the topic of youth justice.

The trip was facilitated by the Open World Leadership Program, a program of the Library of Congress that facilitates educational trips to the United States for Eurasian leaders. This trip is Great Falls' eighth time hosting a delegation through the program, said Sandra Erickson of the city's Advisory Commission on International Relationships, which has managed to secure a hosting job by applying in a competitive process between cities across the country.

Maksim Belayev, Radik Gilmanov and Lenar Valishin serve the republic of Tatarstan as members of Russia's supreme court, a position they attained after being appointed by then-Russian President Vladimir Putin. Roman Davidov and Rafis Gafiyatullin serve in Tatarstan's lower district court. They also were appointed by the president.

The five judges spent time in Helena, where they were able to meet with U.S. Magistrate Keith Strong and tour the Capitol. They were taken aback by the amount of security they had to pass through at the federal courthouse.

The Russian judicial leaders were able to learn about many of the differences that exist between the U.S. judicial system and the one they preside over. For one thing, Russia's supreme court is considerably larger, made up of 85 justices split between a civil department and a criminal department. The Russian judges also said youth have fewer restrictions in their punishments in America than in Russia, where anyone under the age of 18 cannot be sentenced to more than 10 years in prison, regardless of the offense.

The two countries also have a lot to learn from one another, said the judges, speaking through interpreter Tatiana Lukenbill.

16.12.2010 17:11 (), 21.12.2010 09:05 ()

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 









 
 
 
 
 
 
 






 
 
 
 

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